• Coordination between Equilibrium and Mobility—Hu Kun Jung’s Solo Exhibition / 2017.07.08- 08.19
  • Coordination between Equilibrium and Mobility—Hu Kun Jung’s Solo Exhibition / 2017.07.08- 08.19
  • Coordination between Equilibrium and Mobility—Hu Kun Jung’s Solo Exhibition / 2017.07.08- 08.19

Coordination between Equilibrium and Mobility—Hu Kun Jung’s Solo Exhibition / 2017.07.08- 08.19

Hu Kun-jung’s art can be described as geometric abstract expression. Using this approach, the artist seeks a pure, direct viewing experience. Underpinned with geometric structure, pure forms activated by colors produce subtle rhythms on the two-dimensional surface of the painting to create unlimited open space. Multiple works in Coordination between Equilibrium and Mobility allow viewers to experience the beauty of art overflowing with energy in a tranquil space.

Coordination between Equilibrium and Mobility features more than 10 works from 2010 and two new works from 2017. Over this seven-year period Hu Kun-Jung spent a considerable amount of time “living seriously.”For instance, he ferments his own soy sauce and vinegar, making wine and spirits, and baking bread. He purchases tea from farmers, and rice from wholesale merchants, growing vegetables and caring for plants while at the same time ruminating on reasons for making art. Residing on the outskirts of Taipei in Xindian, he lives a tranquil and stable life, in constant pursuit of a natural, pure lifestyle, and looking forward to producing more penetrating, immaculate, and refined art.

Hu Kun-Jung has said that abstraction lets the artist and viewers engage in free and unrestricted dialogue, and to delicately express the elevated spiritual nature of art. Consequently, while not adept at spinning stories about his works, he makes no bones about expressing what lies in his heart and mind, pursuing his ideation of an idyllic world in his life. His reticence perhaps somewhat severe, it is nonetheless the artist’s most sincere declaration.

Not physically large, the artist’s new 2017 works nonetheless contain even richer shapes and color fields. Whilst the viewer may recognize the kinetic feel of his 2004-05 works, and even some of the characteristics of 2010’s The Discontinuous Squares and Movement Series, the new works seem to move more acutely - each block of color becoming an organic entity on the canvas, moving and swirling, and disorienting the viewer. Masquerade’s shapes and colors flow like wispy clouds, evoking longing and romance. Meanwhile, A Summer Sunset in Normandy is tightly structured, the arrangement of colors further displaying the artist’s exacting individuality, the space more complex and penetrating, yet giving full release to the energy he seeks to convey.